Jump directly to the content
Migrant crisis

EU plans could threaten Britain’s power to deport asylum seekers

All claims may have to be filtered through Brussels

BRITAIN’S power to deport failed asylum seekers could be under threat from alarming plans to “centralise” all claims in Brussels.

If agreed, a new federal agency would rule on asylum pleas lodged across the EU.

Officials are desperate to shore up the system after a record near-1.3million claims were made last year.

 Shelter ... cabins at a new camp in Dunkirk, northern France
1
Shelter ... cabins at a new camp in Dunkirk, northern France

While Britain would be able to opt out, the move could also see Brussels axe the Dublin Convention which allows member states to send migrants back to the first EU country they enter.

The convention has allowed Britain to deport 12,000 failed asylum seekers since 2003.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel triggered the recent rush of refugees to Germany last September by waiving the Dublin Convention rules.

The plan is one of a number of proposals being considered before the next EU leaders’ summit on March 17.

It comes just days after Home Office Minister Richard Harrington admitted deporting migrants wasn’t “easy”.

 Fired up ... work to demolish parts of the jungle continue
1
Fired up ... work to demolish parts of the jungle continue

Sources say the European Commission may give Britain a “carve out” — allowing refugees to be returned to EU states — as they are desperate not to “rock the boat” before the UK referendum.

David Cameron said: “There’s no prospect of Britain joining a common asylum process in Europe.”

Meanwhile, as the French authorities continue demolition work at the Jungle in Calais, migrants have begun arriving at a new £2.4million charity-funded camp near Dunkirk.

The site has heated shelters with loos and showers.